Data and Knowledge

ESRA (E-Survey of Road Users’ Attitudes) is a joint initiative of road safety institutes, research centres, government departments, and private sponsors, from all over the world. The aim is to collect and analyse comparable data on road safety performance, in particular road safety culture and behaviours for policy measures.

 

ESRA (E-Survey of Road Users’ Attitudes) is a joint initiative of road safety institutes, research centres, government departments, and private sponsors, from all over the world. The aim is to collect and analyse comparable data on road safety performance, in particular road safety culture and behaviours for policy measures.

 

ESRA (E-Survey of Road Users’ Attitudes) is a joint initiative of road safety institutes, research centres, government departments, and private sponsors, from all over the world. The aim is to collect and analyse comparable data on road safety performance, in particular road safety culture and behaviours for policy measures.

 

ESRA (E-Survey of Road Users’ Attitudes) is a joint initiative of road safety institutes, research centres, government departments, and private sponsors, from all over the world. The aim is to collect and analyse comparable data on road safety performance, in particular road safety culture and behaviours for policy measures.

 

ESRA (E-Survey of Road Users’ Attitudes) is a joint initiative of road safety institutes, research centres, government departments, and private sponsors, from all over the world. The aim is to collect and analyse comparable data on road safety performance, in particular road safety culture and behaviours for policy measures.

 

The Guide for Determining Readiness for Speed Cameras and Other Automated Enforcement is particularly designed to address the questions of many countries who are considering the introduction of a speed camera program, or similar automated system. These technologies are, on the whole, effective, but require extensive ground work to ensure their benefits - and many countries have not yet engaged in this ground work but are considering these systems.  

 

The Guide for Road Safety Opportunities and Challenges: Low and Middle-Income Country Profiles, is the first data report to cover all 125 LMICs with comprehensive road safety country profiles. The profiles present information on each pillar of road safety—management, roads, speed, vehicles, road users, and post-crash care—, to help countries and development practitioners identify challenges and opportunities, and monitor progress.

 
The UN General Assembly has adopted a new resolution on global road safety, recalling that the Sustainable Development Goals are integrated and indivisible, and acknowledging the importance of reaching the road safety-related targets of the 2030 Agenda.
 
The Ten Step Plan for Safer Road Infrastructure will build the institutional capacity and regulatory framework to support these targets and unlock the potential of safer roads and safer cities to save lives.
 
This report examines the safety aspects associated with the increasing use of e-scooters and other forms of micromobility in cities.
 
Get an overview of Cambodia's road safety situation, its national policy and actions, and the Road Crash and Victim Information System (RCVIS).
 
This presentation covers Afghanistan's role in transport and transit in the region. It also lists the national roads in Afghanistan, the overall road situation, challenges and proposed solutions.
 
Know more about the objectives, strategic targets, and primary goals of Mongolia's National Road Safety Strategy 2012-2020
 
Get an overview of the current road safety situation, statistics and challenges in Azerbaijan. Know more about the projects carried out by organizations within the country and the next steps towards improving Azerbaijan road safety.
 
These slides present an overview and statistics of the road safety situation in Cambodia, followed by projects and programs tackling the key issues and challenges in this area.
 
Country-collected data on road traffic deaths broken down by road user groups. Data were collected from a number of different sectors and stakeholders in each country and were submitted to the World Health Organization after consensus meetings, facilitated by national data coordinators.
 
Maximum speed limit for cars on these two road types. Urban roads: these are roads within cities or built up areas (e.g. residential areas); Rural roads: these are roads that are not urban roads nor roads going between cities
 
 

Partner Websites

The Big Data Tool summarises star rating and investment plan data – over 400 million data points – based on 358,000km of roads across 54 countries covering over 700 billion vehicle kilometres of travel every year.

The Road Safety Toolkit provides free information on the causes and prevention of road crashes that cause death and injury.

These documents provide information and knowledge for partners so that they can lead, undertake and implement iRAP assessments.

Maximising travel on roads that are 3-star or better will save lives and reduce injuries. Applying the global standard and ensuring all new roads are built to at least a 3-star standard for all road users and existing roads are upgraded to achieve >75% of travel on 3-star or better roads is the vaccine we need.

These select publications have been developed jointly by multiple partner agencies of the UN Road Safety Collaboration or in some cases by individual partner agencies.