The Asia Pacific Road Safety Observatory (APRSO) is the regional forum on road safety data, policies and practices to ensure the protection of human life on the roads across Asia and the Pacific.   Read More

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Video message by Young Tae Kim, Secretary-General of the International Transport Forum (ITF), during the First Workshop on the Implementation of the Asia Pacific Road Safety Observatory, 26 August 2020.
 
Video message by Hartwig Schafer, World Bank Vice President for South Asia, during the First Workshop on the Implementation of the Asia Pacific Road Safety Observatory, 26 August 2020.
 
Video message by Jean Todt, President of the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile (FIA), during the First Workshop on the Implementation of the Asia Pacific Road Safety Observatory, 26 August 2020.
 
This video documents keynotes and speeches from the Road Safety Benchmarking and Regional Road Safety Observatories High-level Meeting, a high-level meeting that explored the importance of reliable road safety data to develop sound road safety policies and the opportunites for road safety benchmarking to raise road safety on the political agenda.
 
In recent years, particularly in many developing countries, road developers have failed to give sufficient consideration to road safety features in the design and construction of highways. As a result, these roads have become more deadly.
 
Star ratings are an internationally recognized, evidence-based approach to guiding design and investment for safer road transport and are increasingly being used for road and infrastructure projects and policies throughout Asia and the Pacific.
 
If you knew that slowing down a little on your way home from work today might save your life or that of a loved one, would you do it? Please do so, and convince others to halve road deaths and injuries by 2020.
 
The Safetipin app maps safe public areas for urban women so they can make safer decisions, and provides city stakeholders data to improve safety in public spaces and transport.
 

ESRA (E-Survey of Road Users’ Attitudes) is a joint initiative of road safety institutes, research centres, government departments, and private sponsors, from all over the world. The aim is to collect and analyse comparable data on road safety performance, in particular road safety culture and behaviours for policy measures.

 

ESRA (E-Survey of Road Users’ Attitudes) is a joint initiative of road safety institutes, research centres, government departments, and private sponsors, from all over the world. The aim is to collect and analyse comparable data on road safety performance, in particular road safety culture and behaviours for policy measures.

 

ESRA (E-Survey of Road Users’ Attitudes) is a joint initiative of road safety institutes, research centres, government departments, and private sponsors, from all over the world. The aim is to collect and analyse comparable data on road safety performance, in particular road safety culture and behaviours for policy measures.

 

ESRA (E-Survey of Road Users’ Attitudes) is a joint initiative of road safety institutes, research centres, government departments, and private sponsors, from all over the world. The aim is to collect and analyse comparable data on road safety performance, in particular road safety culture and behaviours for policy measures.

 

ESRA (E-Survey of Road Users’ Attitudes) is a joint initiative of road safety institutes, research centres, government departments, and private sponsors, from all over the world. The aim is to collect and analyse comparable data on road safety performance, in particular road safety culture and behaviours for policy measures.

 

The Guide for Determining Readiness for Speed Cameras and Other Automated Enforcement is particularly designed to address the questions of many countries who are considering the introduction of a speed camera program, or similar automated system. These technologies are, on the whole, effective, but require extensive ground work to ensure their benefits - and many countries have not yet engaged in this ground work but are considering these systems.  

 

The Guide for Road Safety Opportunities and Challenges: Low and Middle-Income Country Profiles, is the first data report to cover all 125 LMICs with comprehensive road safety country profiles. The profiles present information on each pillar of road safety—management, roads, speed, vehicles, road users, and post-crash care—, to help countries and development practitioners identify challenges and opportunities, and monitor progress.

 
The UN General Assembly has adopted a new resolution on global road safety, recalling that the Sustainable Development Goals are integrated and indivisible, and acknowledging the importance of reaching the road safety-related targets of the 2030 Agenda.
 
The Ten Step Plan for Safer Road Infrastructure will build the institutional capacity and regulatory framework to support these targets and unlock the potential of safer roads and safer cities to save lives.
 
This report examines the safety aspects associated with the increasing use of e-scooters and other forms of micromobility in cities.
 
Get an overview of Cambodia's road safety situation, its national policy and actions, and the Road Crash and Victim Information System (RCVIS).
 
This presentation covers Afghanistan's role in transport and transit in the region. It also lists the national roads in Afghanistan, the overall road situation, challenges and proposed solutions.
 
Know more about the objectives, strategic targets, and primary goals of Mongolia's National Road Safety Strategy 2012-2020
 
Get an overview of the current road safety situation, statistics and challenges in Azerbaijan. Know more about the projects carried out by organizations within the country and the next steps towards improving Azerbaijan road safety.
 
These slides present an overview and statistics of the road safety situation in Cambodia, followed by projects and programs tackling the key issues and challenges in this area.
 
Country-collected data on road traffic deaths broken down by road user groups. Data were collected from a number of different sectors and stakeholders in each country and were submitted to the World Health Organization after consensus meetings, facilitated by national data coordinators.

Maximum speed limit for cars on these two road types. Urban roads: these are roads within cities or built up areas (e.g. residential areas); Rural roads: these are roads that are not urban roads nor roads going between cities

Estimated number of deaths due to road traffic fatal injury in the specified year.